Rock ‘n Roll Uniform (In Which The Blogger Goes Full “Fangurl”)

Hey guys and gals!

I know I said summer wardrobe planning was my next post, but I mayyyyyy have gotten a little carried away with something else in the meantime. 😉

I told you all about my new gig as a guitar player for a 90’s alt-rock cover band (thank you for the kind words on that, BTW!), and we recently had our first show together. I decided about 3 weeks before the show (of course) that I needed to make a new outfit for the occasion. O_o I haven’t been in a band in a couple of years, so between giving stuff away and my style evolving, nothing gig-worthy I owned really felt like “Me” anymore. I don’t know about any of you, but when I am preparing to get up in front of a lot of people, I get very anxious; feeling comfortable with my clothing and appearance can go a long way in terms of building my confidence (or at least giving me 1 less thing to stress about). So obviously I wasn’t about to go onstage feeling like I was wearing a costume or trying too hard. A new outfit seemed like The Answer. And I think it’s safe to say it was:

Rachel's Haircut (5 of 52)

Outfit in action!

Rachel's Haircut (29 of 52)

SKIRT!

Rachel's Haircut (43 of 52)

A non-crummy photo of me at a mic. #festivusmiracle

Skirt and Top (3 of 12)

The outfit in daylight

Skirt and Top (4 of 12)

Back

Separates were my first thought, both because I couldn’t think of rock-ready dress patterns and because separates would be easy to split up and wear with other things I own already. I started with the most critical piece: the skirt. In my epic Fall planning post of epicness, I had mentioned wanting to use a boucle I had for a Named Nascha mini skirt; I may not have gotten around to that in the Fall/Winter, but better late than never!

Skirt and Top (8 of 12)

Front view! (Now with awkward hands!!)

Skirt and Top (9 of 12)

Gettin’ the whole skirt in there…

The fabric is BANANAS, isn’t it?!? I love it. I bought it thinking I’d make a jacket but I am SO GLAD I changed my mind. I love it as a skirt!

I got this material from Gorgeous Fabrics, and am so excited that I can now wear it after staring at it for over a year. It’s such a unique fabric, and fun fact: there’s cellophane in the weave!! WUT. It made pressing trickier (which is why the hips look a little lumpy–they need re-pressed), but it was totally worth it. 😀 Other fun fact: some of the yarns glow under certain lights.

Rachel's Haircut (11 of 52)

IT GLOWS.

Rachel's Haircut (13 of 52)

You guys, I made an electric skirt.

The glow-in-the-dark nature of the skirt got more comments for me afterwards than any other aspect of the gig, which means 1.) it’s pretty cool and 2.) clearly my guitar-playing is less impressive than my sewing. I can live with that!

Construction Notes

Nascha is designed to be lined, which is good because this boucle NEEDS a lining to wear smoothly. I used a black bemberg rayon and it makes the skirt much easier to wear and put on/take off. I have never lined anything but a bag before this skirt, folks. But having worked through difficult-for-me Named instructions with my Reeta, I was able to understand the steps and nail lining this thing on the first try.


You can see that I accidentally sewed one half of the lining inside out…oops. I didn’t feel like unpicking it, because it’s just the lining. 😉 I made my lining a little “extra bigger” (the pattern pieces are definitely larger than the shell) just in case, which worked out fine; any extra fabric got pleated into the waist and hem and make the skirt feel a little less snug than it looks. 😀

Skirt and Top (10 of 12)

Close-up of the zipper

I have never sewn an exposed zipper before, and not to be a cocky jerk or anything, but…#nailedit. I used a 7″ zipper because that was what I had, so I had to make the CB opening longer (the pattern calls for a 6″ zip). That was a good thing in the end though, because this thing is TIGHT. Funny story, I bought this zipper (and 2 others) AND my lining fabric to make a Named Mai Zip Jacket a couple of years ago! I still haven’t made that jacket, but I did finally use this zipper and a little bit of the lining material. 😉

This fabric frays when cut, so I serged all the edges of each piece right after I cut them out. I also gave myself an extra 1″ on the side seams, just in case. Before I put the zip in, I sewed the sides up on the 1″ line (so, giving myself the 3/8″ included seam allowance as wearing ease until I could try it on). Good thing too, as I needed some room in the full hip to be able to sit down!

Pattern Alterations

For reference, I started with the US0/EUR32 size, as I do with all Named patterns. I added 2″ of length at the lengthen/shorten line (or at least that’s what I think the line was–it wasn’t clearly labelled on my PDF pieces) because I have heard tales of how truly “mini” this skirt is. Named drafts for 5’8″, and while I am not much taller than that and have shorter legs for my height, I wasn’t taking any chances, especially with that big split at CF. I wanted to make sure I could wear it to work or a gig without anyone seeing my panties. YMMV. #freethelabia

Having said that, I couldn’t really tell where the skirt was supposed to sit: at the natural waist, or at the high hip, or somewhere else. (The pattern says, “regular-waisted.” Does that mean natural waist??) Mine sits at my true waist; if it didn’t, I wouldn’t want the 2″ I added. Because I put mine up so high, I had to take in the side seams from the waist down for about 3-4 inches. I waited until I got the zipper in to do that, so I could really test the fit. That was also when I opted to let out a little bit of seam allowance at the fullest part of my hips so I could sit down with confidence. (I had to bend my knees together and SLOWLY lower myself onto a seat in the first round of testing; Tom thought it was hilarious, probably in part because I happened to be trying to “sit” using the toilet in our downstairs bathroom. 0/10, would not recommend.)

Other than that, I just followed the directions and had good luck with everything fitting nicely; no other adjustments were necessary. The back in particular is very nicely fitted, and my ass looks fabulous in it, if I may say so. The front vents, however, are acting a little odd: they have weird wrinkles or bubbles near the turn, and I don’t know why–everything is done correctly and without alterations from the pattern. Maybe it’s my fabric? Maybe the skirt is too pegged for my legs near the hem? Oh well.

Speaking of this fabric, I bought 2 yards and I have PLENTY left for another…thing. This is more impressive given the defined stripes AND the width: 45″. I am very conflicted about whether to make anything else with this fabric. O_o

So that’s the skirt! Moving on to the top:

Skirt and Top (11 of 12) (1)

Top!

Skirt and Top (12 of 12)

Top again!

This is an Inari crop tee, with just a couple of insignificant small mods, made in a black tencel jersey. That’s right: my new onstage outfit was ALL Named patterns. #sorrynotsorry I think that finally puts me at full #fangurl status, but I’m happy to gush my Named love all over the internet: their patterns just work for me. (Plus they know WTF they’re doing technically, and are able to produce full collections twice a year–totally gush-worthy in my book.)

I had never worked with tencel fabric before this, but it was similar to working with the modal/silk jersey I used for some Penny Raglans last year. I bought my fabric from Blackbird Fabrics and have another colorway waiting in the wings. It’s really, really nice stuff! I was surprised that the top didn’t read as sheer once I put it on; the fabric itself is only semi-opaque (noted by Blackbird–her descriptions are always spot-on) but didn’t show my bra or anything.

Pattern and Construction Notes

I picked the Inari pattern because I wanted something loose, cropped, and somewhat plain to balance the outfit, since the skirt is so outrageous. I was thisclose to using the Penny Raglan pattern, but felt it would be too much boxy volume. I do sort of wish I’d thought to try to frankenpattern the raglan portion of Penny onto my Inari, though! A lot of folks have mentioned the dropped armholes of the Inari being limiting for range of motion, but since 1.) I picked a drapey and stretchy-ish knit and 2.) I am the least mobile guitar player of all time, I decided it wouldn’t be an issue.

In terms of changes, I didn’t use the cuff bands because my fabric is so floppy and light. I had added a little length to the sleeves and took a 5/8″ hem, but if I had it to do over, I wouldn’t have added any length. I added about 1″ to the hem, and again took a 5/8″ hem. I also sewed all the seams of this top at 1/4″ for some reason. For real, I can’t remember why I did that.

This top took maybe 2 hours from cut to “not-hemmed-but-sewn.” The best part? I was able to conserve yardage AGAIN and had enough of my lovely tencel knit left for a regular, full-length t-shirt. Yay!!

So that’s my new gig outfit! I would show you all more show pics but the band still needs to go over them all and decide which ones we want to use. 🙂

Hopefully I’ll be back soon with either a finished thing, or some Summer Sewing Plans!

What was the last outfit you made specifically for an upcoming event? Do you have any suggestions for what I should do with ~1.5 yards of that outlandish boucle fabric? Please share! ❤

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20 thoughts on “Rock ‘n Roll Uniform (In Which The Blogger Goes Full “Fangurl”)

  1. Ahhh, so cute! I have the same fabric, bought from a joint in the Garment District, but I have no idea what to make with it! It’s perfect as a skirt! You look super rock & roll!

  2. Smashed it! You have achieved the ultimate gig look: ultra cool without looking like you tried too hard! Great choice of fabric, And Named are made for rock’n’roll, you know it, I know it, they just are.
    I’m currently working on gig pieces but sadly not for band gigs of which I have none anymore, but the sparkly spangly cabaret wardrobe is going to be fun too.

  3. Wow! That fabric even glows!!you could not have asked for a better gig outfit, and I totally agree, the outfit can make or break your confidence! I’ve made a couple of special outfits for singing gigs, but since I’m not in a band anymore, they’ve consisted of various versions of LBDs. Love the tee too. NAmed patterns are fabulous. Will you create a new look for each gig?

    • LOL Yeah, the glowing was 100% a surprise–we don’t practice with stage lights, and I didn’t notice until a few songs in that those stripes were electric! I love that you made LBDs for gigs: they’re a perfect choice! I haven’t decided if each gig will get a new outfit (we don’t have any more booked yet) but it’s definitely a possibility. I should probably start a project list! 😉

    • Thank you, Andie! I feel like I look stupid and awkward up there, so your comment made me smile. 🙂 And seriously, how am I ever going to top a glowing mini skirt?? Future gig outfits might be all downhill from here, LOL!

  4. I completely agree that getting the right outfit reduces the anxiety quotient massively. And this outfit is a really great choice – blingy and fabulous but also try to who you are (i.e. Just a little bit conservative and restrained). Also I am sure your guitar playing is at least as good as your sewing!! You rock alright.

    • It’s funny, Kate: I got so many comments about my “electric” skirt that it was like I didn’t have a guitar at all, haha! I am glad it looks like “me”; I could have gone for a short, tight, black knit dress but it wouldn’t have been quite right. 🙂

  5. Pingback: Showtime = Sew Time! | Life in A "Mads" House

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