2017 Top 5, Part 1: Hits, Misses, and Highlights!

Top 5

Hey, everyone!

It’s that magical time again: Top 5 season! I look forward to doing this every year, so I hope you all don’t mind reading about it. 😉 Gillian’s link-up post is here, if you want to find even more Top 5 posts!

As usual, I won’t do a full battery of separate posts for each section (Hits, Misses, Highlights, Reflections, Goals) but will group them together in my usual fashion (Hits + Misses + Highlights, Reflections + Goals). Before we dive in though, here are some “Mads Stats” for my 2017 sewing!

Total Garments Made: 30!!!!! WUT. Seriously, this deserves confetti, guys! This is by far my highest output ever; in 2016 I only managed 12 garments (plus 1 set of potholders and 6 sharks…), and 2015 was only marginally better at 13 (plus 1 shark). FWIW, I have my “fail” garments in that tally, because they were completely finished before they were designated as “fails.” More on those in a bit!

I am somewhat shocked at my productivity this year, because I felt like I was really busy in 2017 (for me–we introverted homebodies have a decidedly skewed perspective on what constitutes a hectic schedule)! But maybe having more commitments helped me devote more of my downtime to my sewing, since I knew I didn’t have All The Time In The World. 😉 Whatever happened, I am hoping to keep it going in 2018–my goal is to replace all my RTW stuff with self-made, after all!

So I made 30 things, but what 30 things did I make?? Below is a little chart that breaks that down:

Garment Type

As you can see, Tops were my “top” category this year! 😉 Pants look pretty robust, but that includes the 2 pairs of Hudson pants I made for myself so it’s a little misleading. “Other” is where I put my lady tux jacket and the two Burda 6718 sweaters I made for Tom. (One was a surprise gift for Xmas, so you haven’t seen it yet!) I count those more as outerwear than tops worn by themselves. 😉 And Skirts and Dresses were pretty neglected categories, but hopefully I can do something about that in 2018.

As to my Fails, I actually had 5 of them (according to my parameters–my sewing, my rules!); here is where they occurred:

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You guys know I tend to put things in both the Hits and Misses category sometimes, and that’s what’s happening with the Pants and Other “Fail” items in that chart: those are my tux trousers and jacket. One top Fail and the dress Fail are ones that you all haven’t seen: the top was a t-shirt for Tom (the one that shrank a whole bunch in the first wash), and the dress is one I made this summer that I ended up hating. :-/ But in all, I’d say that 5 fails out of 30 things sewn is pretty good! It’s also not a surprise that the most populous category had the highest number of Fails–that’s to be expected.

Since most of what I made this year was for me (yayyyy!), I won’t be counting Tom’s stuff toward my Hits and Misses this year (his stuff is all Hits though, hooray!). So without further ado:

Top 5 Hits

  1. Hudson Pants
  2. M7471 (same post as above)
  3. Black jeans
  4. Navy/white striped Lark tee
  5. Blair Shirt
    Honorable Mention: Both of my Reeta shirtdresses and my tux

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11.24.17 clothes dump (24 of 42)

pink shirt-striped shirt (11 of 17)

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Before you wail on me for putting sweatpants at the number 1 spot, I want to point out that they are in that spot because I wore them more than any other thing I made this year–by far. As in, every single night that it was cold or chilly (or over-air conditioned), I wore my Hudson pants to bed. I am so glad I finally made that pattern! Now I just need MORE!! (Sorry guys, I am not a very sexy sleeper–function over form is my pajama jam!)

The rest of my Top 5 is mostly about the same concept: how important things were to me getting dressed once they were made. The Blair is kind of an exception to that, since it’s very seasonal in Ohio, but I am really proud of it–it’s just one of my favorite things I’ve made!

That brings us to my Top 5 Misses for the year. These are my Fails from the 2nd chart, although I don’t have a photo of Tom’s sad shrunken t-shirt for you.

Top 5 Misses:

  1. Tuxedo Jacket
  2. Tuxedo Trousers
  3. M7591 Dress
  4. Men’s Raglan T-Shirt, Mk I
  5. Selja Knot Tee

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abbeytux (6 of 16)Dress (1 of 13)

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My tux had to be in the Misses category, too–I am just not super happy with how it turned out. I know I can do better. 😦 That M7591 dress, though I wore it out of the house twice, is just super unflattering IMO and I don’t think the colors are good on me either; I can pretty much guarantee that thing is being recycled. (Yes, that’s right: I went to all the trouble of taking blog photos of M7591 but never finished the post. That doesn’t bode well for a garment, does it?) And the Selja is just a poor-fitting top all around, and I hate my stripe-matching fuck up. I only wore it twice (3 times if you count blog photos). It’s probably getting recycled, too. 😦

Now it’s time for my Top 5 Non-Sewing Highlights of 2017! I just made it to 5 of these, guys–some of them aren’t particularly earth-shattering, but they made my year better!

  1. Knitting – 2017 was my first full calendar year as a knitter, and I am still totally in love with this hobby. 😀 ❤ Not only did I branch out to cowls and fingerless mitts this year, I set a personal goal to knit 12 pairs of socks in 2017 AND I DID IT! (And incidentally, half of them were made for other people!) I also started my very first sweater, and although it isn’t even close to being done, that’s a big milestone. And my sister gifted me Bristol Ivy’s new book for Xmas, so I have plenty of inspiration for my 2018 knitting already!
  2. Band – I auditioned for a 90’s alt-rock cover band in January and somehow they took me. 😉 (I maintain that it’s because I am a girl, and girls in rock bands–even if they’re hack musicians–is super 90’s…) It’s been challenging but also a lot of fun, and I’m looking forward to us being more active in 2018! It’s also been a great excuse to sew crazy shit, like my glow-in-the-dark skirt. I’m hoping to make Gig Sewing a “thing” in 2018 as well!
  3. New Axe – Related to #2, I bought a new guitar this year! I haven’t bought a guitar in 7 years, so this is a big deal! Since the band typically plays hours-long sets, I need a backup for my JagStang. So what did I get? A Fender Modern Player Telecaster Plus! It’s literally their own knock-off of the original Fender Telecaster Plus from the late 80’s/mid 90’s era. (Johnny Greenwood from Radiohead had one–need I say more?) The original Tele Plus is long discontinued, and while you can find them used, they’re ridiculously expensive. Lucky for me, Fender makes this version for a wayyyyyy better price. Which is good, because I have an art sticker that’s been burning a hole in my proverbial pocket, just waiting to be slapped onto a guitar–I wouldn’t do that to a pricey one! 😉
  4. Family – Frankly, any year that we are still a family of 5 is a good one! Tycho has had more health concerns this year, and we are trying to enjoy whatever time together we have left. Tom and I celebrated our 9th wedding anniversary in 2017, which is ridiculous! 😉 And my aunt is moving back to Ohio after many years in another state, which is exciting.
  5. Tales From The Crypt – This year, due to another performer getting sick, I was asked to help with a really cool event at a local historic mausoleum, Greenlawn Abbey. I got to dress in (authentic!) 1910’s garb and tell visitors about a particular person who is buried there. The setting is breathtaking, of course: the mausoleum dates to 1927 and is made of granite, with an interior of white marble. Not only that, but the preservation association working to restore and publicize the site has done incredible work and is all volunteers. (The Abbey fell into disrepair over the decades since its completion, and was truly in a sorry state when these folks stepped in.) I have attended this event as a guest, so it was really a privilege to be asked to participate–these are real stories we’re telling, after all! I am considering joining the association officially next year, if I think I can commit the time. And if not, I still plan to help as much as I can!
BeFunky Collage

Literally every finished knitting project for 2017!

Band

Band in action!

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YASSSSSS

Family

D’awwwww

GLA Collage

Tales from the Crypt!

That’s it for the first part of my Top 5 for 2017! I’ll be back very shortly with my Top 5 Reflections and Goals. 😀 Thanks for reading!!

 

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Operation Lady Tux, Part 3: Camisole and Trousers

Welcome to the 3rd and final part of my Totally Unnecessary Holiday Outfit-slash-Designin’ December series! If you’ve made it this far, you’re in for some more stupid mistakes and vague successes. Buckle up! 😉 (Part 1 is here; Part 2 is here.)

Let’s start with the camisole!

Making of: Camisole

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I want you people to know that it was 38F and raining when we took these–that’s how much I love you.

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Seriously, I adore the back view of this cami! So hot!!

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OMG MY FACE THO! #dead xD

Having decided to make trousers and a jacket, my last consideration for this outfit concerned my tits and how I was going to cover them, LOL. Obviously I have to be careful here, because my event is a work party: I can’t be all Hollywood, showing up in a tux and 1. nothing or 2. a lace bralette, even if I wanted to–I have to look my fellow attendees in the eye the Monday after!* 😀 On the other hand, I didn’t want to be completely covered up; one of the many luxuries of being small-chested is being able to “get away” with wearing very low-cut tops and showing some cleavage ribs, and I wanted to counter the pants-and-jacket coverage of the rest of my outfit somehow.

Because of the strong impression left by the Gwyneth Paltrow inspo outfit, I decided that a lace camisole was a good middle ground. Having bought the Ogden pattern right when it came out, that was my go-to. I had my lace already–a beautiful black chantilly with double scallop borders and some metallic thread. I thought I may have to order lining, but NOPE! Stash to the rescue: I had this amazing peachy, almost-rose-gold colored J. Crew silk/cotton voile that was perfect under the black lace. Yay!

*Funny enough, the same colleague who made me feel like a million bucks in my outfit also suggested that I could have worn a lace bralette underneath the jacket. She kinda made me wish I’d done that, LOL!

Construction

This camisole was SO EFFING EASY to make! I want an army of them now. 😉 The hardest part was cutting everything out and underlining the pieces. That took me a couple of hours one weekend afternoon, but sewing everything together into a wearable garment took about the same amount of time on a different day. It was so fast!!

I used my silk/cotton voile as an underlining for the lace shell, and used it again for the half-lining that’s part of the pattern. I also made the straps out of it, though I made them my own way (the same way I made my Reeta drawstrings) so they were a little heftier. I lengthened the straps as well (versus the pattern), AND added length to the hemline. I regret the latter, as I didn’t realize how long it would end up! And since I used the scallop edge for the hem, it wasn’t like I could go back and shorten it. Womp womp.

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Straps

This is a great little pattern for using small pieces of special fabric! I have leftovers from my 2016 dress that will definitely be made into an Ogden, and I can see myself making tons of them…maybe even a dress version, too!

So that’s the skinny on what I wore on my top half; next up, some kinda-busted trousers!

Making Of: Trousers

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Okay, the back view is pretty ace…

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Side, with fancy tux stripes!

I made my trousers from the exact same fabrics as my jacket: wool/nylon/lycra suiting with wool sateen accents, plus bemberg for the pocket linings. I think that suiting is definitely too bulky for these trousers, a fact which magnifies and is in turn magnified by the flaws in the trousers that are of my own making. :-/

For the pants, I decided on straight legs (wide are NOT my jam usually, and skinny probably won’t “age” well) with the all-important “tuxedo stripe” on the outseam, angled front slash pockets (as opposed to inseam or no pockets), full-length (not cropped), and no back pockets or front crease. I also didn’t do a fly front, which in retrospect was probably a mistake but oh well. What I should have done is pick a proper trouser pattern, but I went back to V9160 because I had loved the shape of the pants last year.

Construction

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Sorry, it’s really dark!!

As I said, my mistake was probably trying to shoehorn V9160 into a tuxedo pant. :-/ At first, things were going okay: I got the front slash pockets how I wanted them, having drafted new pocket bags and all that. I also took the waist in a couple of inches (you’d think I’d measure that area carefully since I seem to do this every. single. time. I make bottoms…) which skewed my stripes to the back slightly at the waist, but it wasn’t super awful-looking. But I got cocky sloppy and free-handed the shape of the leg below the knee (I made my muslin about that length because #lazy and to use less muslin) instead of using my muslin for the ass/pockets and the pattern for the legs. Derp.

The resulting trousers–totally assembled except for the waistband and zipper–were too wide to be straight-leg, but too narrow to be wide-leg. THE WORST, amirite? At this point, Smart Abbey returned and got out the V9160 pieces and re-chalked the lines. But Lazy Abbey wasn’t through with me yet, and instead of unpicking my racing stripes (OMG THE TIME THAT WOULD TAKE) I adjusted the best I could using just the inseams. So you will notice the seams aren’t quite plumb from crotch to hem, if you catch my drift. 😉 Lazy Abbey partly justified this by pointing out the risks of re-doing the stripes, which were installed with a pleasantly consistent 3/4″ width all the way down the leg the first time around.

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Pocketses

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Back view

I didn’t put any pockets in the back, which was sort of a last-minute decision; I like the idea of welts in the back to break up all that real estate, but really didn’t want any added bulk on my ass (I worked HARD to get the fit right back there, guys), so ended up leaving them off. I do sort of regret not doing a fly front, just because I think the combination of the thick, spongy fabric AND slash pockets AND no zipper AND a looser fit in my upper front thighs makes them/me look wider in the hips in an unflattering way.

I drafted a waistband and facing (remember, these pants are part of a jumpsuit–no waistband), and used an invisible zip that goes all the way to the top. That was kind of dumb, because the waistband/pants seam juncture is really thick and zipping over it takes effort. :-/ (Shout out to the lycra content though, without which I might never have gotten into these at all. ❤ ) I also hate how wide the waistband ended up: I really should have thought about that more carefully! It’s too close to yoga pants territory for me! Speaking of dumb, I somehow added WAY too much length to the pants when I cut them out–I literally had 5″ to remove before I could hem them, LOLOL! WTF?!? No idea what I was thinking there, but better that than too short!

Shenanigans aside, seeing photos of the trousers after the party really made me feel better about them–it was hard to evaluate the shape of them without a full-length mirror, and I was SURE they were frumpy.

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You guys, THAT IS IT for my Holiday Outfit for 2017! Thank you for sticking with me: I hope you had some laughs at my expense and will learn from my (copious) mistakes. 😉 I will probably be back before New Year’s with Top 5 stuff, so I’ll see you soon. In the meantime, enjoy whatever holiday(s) you are celebrating this month! ❤

 

 

 

Operation Lady Tux, Part 2: Jacket

Hello, and welcome to Part 2 of this year’s Holiday Outfit saga! This post will focus on the jacket, and Part 3 will cover the camisole and trousers. (Part 1 is here!)

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Gosh, if only this jacket had pockets for my #awkwardhands …oh wait.

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Back view! (Yes, my hem needs re-pressed and clapper’d)

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Kinda side view?

The Making Of: Jacket

I worked on this jacket–from cutting out to sewing on the button–for about 2-3 weeks. (By which I mean weeknights after work and weekends, in between engagements and stuff.) For the most part, it was a pleasant experience; the rough parts were pretty brutal, though!

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Basically-done jacket; the dressform is lopsided, so the jacket looks a little wonky.

My jacket is made mostly of a double weave wool/nylon/lycra suiting, but features wool sateen suiting accents (both originally for designer Maiyet, bought from Fabric Mart). The lycra content provides some pretty significant stretch, although it wasn’t really necessary for this jacket. The lining is a bemberg rayon. I had all of this fabric (and the hair canvas) already in stash, and didn’t have to buy a single thing except for the buttons (more of which later) and shoulder pads! In hindsight, the main fabric is a bit thick for this jacket, I think.

I didn’t do any tailoring on the jacket apart from making a back stay and using shoulder pads (1/4″, since my shoulders are square and support garments well on their own) and good quality interfacing (hair canvas and weft). I do wish I had made a sleeve head, though–that totally slipped my mind in the moment.

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Lapel in-progress

The pattern, Burda #127B 11/2012, is one I found about a month before the event. It wasn’t exactly what I originally wanted–I was picturing something between a boyfriend fit and this–but I’ve come to appreciate the shape of it. As to the draft, it’s Burda: they’re tough to beat for consistently well-drafted patterns. 😀 The jacket fits okay, but I didn’t change anything there–a mistake in hindsight, as I think it looks a bit like I made the wrong size. I made the smallest size, the 36. The only change I made was to eliminate the sleeve vents (there is no back vent); those aren’t something I would ever use, and I knew that finding that many buttons I was 100% happy with (and which matched whatever I used for the front button) in my time frame would be a huge pain in my ass for no purpose at all. But the pattern does include them, if you’re wanting that feature!

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Lapel dart

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My shitty attempt to show you how nicely a 2-piece sleeve hangs…

Construction

The jacket was not horrid to sew EXCEPT for the collar assembly. Chr*st on a Cracker, that was horrendous!!! I think part of my issue was that the stand isn’t integrated into the collar–it’s a separate piece. This created more bulk and attachment seams, and if I made this pattern again, I’d fuse those two pieces into one. It didn’t help that my wool/nylon/lycra suiting is quite thick and bouncy: it’s a double weave, and it requires very aggressive pressing/clapper application and tends to bounce back anyway. So all those layers of my material together in such a tight area was tough to cope with and shape effectively. I also foolishly didn’t remember to change the undercollar to 2 (slightly smaller) pieces. 😦

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Jacket, laid down flat (from back)

I honestly thought this jacket was doomed because of the collar area after I initially got it installed, but some encouragement from sewing peeps and a couple of days away from the project gave me the grit to Make It Work. In the end, I tacked/sewed some stuff down to get the collar to sit better. It’s not perfect–FAR from it–but it’s good enough for now. (This kills me, by the way–I am a perfectionist, for better or worse, and I cannot endure what I consider sub-par work on my own part. You know that adage, “Perfect is the enemy of good”? It is definitely NOT my motto…)

I ran into trouble with my lining, too. Somehow, it ended up being too small for the jacket–obviously I made an error someplace! I had enough lining left to cut a sizable strip and “patch” the lining between the back princess seams and the center back; this added more than enough ease for comfortable wearing. Luckily, my sleeve linings didn’t need any adjustments. But it turned out okay in the end: I bagged the entire lining, which I have only ever done on a skirt previously. It felt like sorcery!! The one thing that always confused me was how to sew the sleeves together; most photos I’ve seen create the illusion that you’re sewing them together flat, since it’s a really hard thing to photograph clearly. But I finally understood the mechanics and got the whole lining inserted successfully on the first try–sleeves and all! That was a happy moment. Grainline’s tutorial is probably the best one I’ve found online, by the way: definitely check it out if you’re looking for good, clear directions.

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Lining, before insertion (and emergency surgery!)

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Yeah, I picked a boring lining…

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Hard to see, but here’s my mega-huge ease pleat!

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Sleeve hem

For me, the biggest highlights of this jacket are the pockets. I’ve never made a welt pocket of any kind before, but the tutorial by Kennis at Itch to Stitch is SO FREAKING AMAZING. Seriously, it is superb. Her method made so much sense to me, and was so clear that I didn’t bother doing a practice pocket. She has me motivated to make ALL THE JETTED POCKETSES, people.

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Welt flap

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Flap lining

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Insides!

One final problem? Finding a button. I have a lovely little collection of vintage glass buttons, some of which are jacket-sized. Unfortunately, all the ones I had were too big in proportion to the jacket, so I needed another option.  I decided to cover a button in my wool sateen, but the shoddy kit I bought let me down DURING my party. It was a Dritz kit, and despite the package saying you can make the button by hand, I not only bent the first button with my tiny, pathetic hands (I should have taken that as a bad sign and quit right then), but Tom had to use a mallet to get the damn thing to lock in place in the end. My sateen isn’t very heavy, guys–it’s certainly lighter than some home dec fabrics, which this kit said it was good for. But hey, if it works it’s all worth it, right? Yeah, except that this button didn’t work. It fell apart as I unbuttoned the jacket to take some of the outfit photos in Part 1. I had unbuttoned/buttoned it maybe 10 or 11 times, all told. I was totally gutted. 😦

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What was left of my beautifully-covered button. >=( (Sorry about the cat hair–*somebody* knocked this down and was sitting on it, LOL.)

I fired off a very stern email to Dritz, demanding a refund and complaining about the poor quality of the kit. I actually heard back from them, too. They claim that I essentially bought the “wrong” version of this kit (the craft grade one) and that the “correct” version for my use is better (I’m soooooo sure it is…/sarcasm), but they’re refunding my money anyway. Gee, thanks. #not Seriously, how am I supposed to know that this version is total crap?? I certainly didn’t care that it said “craft” on the package, I just assumed I had the right thing. And don’t crafters deserve sturdy covered buttons just as much as garment sewers? I do love that Dritz basically admitted that one version of the kit is shit though…Fellow sewers, beware of Dritz button kits, unless you plan to frame that button and never use it!!

In the end, I ordered another vintage glass button in the right size (since I’ve made the buttonhole, there’s only 1 right size now!) that’s identical to the one I most wanted to use in the first place. It isn’t here yet, so you’re seeing this with no button–sorry!

So that’s the jacket–what a mess, huh? =/ But fortunately for me, most people won’t see the flaws, even though I certainly do. That said, I learned a lot and will approach my next jacket (or a coat) with a more confident attitude. And really, with a wearable (and not totally awful) jacket AND valuable lesson to show for it, this project was worthwhile.

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Much like the jacket, this photo didn’t turn out quite right! 😉

Stay tuned for the final installment, which covers the simpler two pieces: the camisole and the trousers!

Operation Lady Tux, Part 1: Big Reveal and Inspiration

Helloooooooooooo!

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Here I am, having made yet another stupid formal thing for a not-nearly-that-formal work party. 😉 As per usual, it was quite a journey from starting the project to the night of my party, but overall I’m pretty pleased with how it came together. I’ve got a lot to say about this project, not just because things got a little fuck-y, but because IT’S THREE SEPARATE PIECES. So I’ve decided to do a 3-part series: the first installment will cover the big debut of my Lady Tux and my inspiration; Part 2 will cover the jacket; Part 3 will cover the camisole and trousers.

I am also tossing this thing into the ring for Designin’ December, after not playing along last year but finding very definite designer inspo for my 2017 look(s). 😀

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Inspiration

So how did I end up with a Lady Tux? Honestly, it took me some time to figure that out. My biggest issue this year was what type of “Thing” to make. After last year, where I had a very firm idea of what I wanted that was carried over from the prior year, 2017’s outfit was a bit of a second-guess fest. I waffled about what to make starting immediately after last year’s event! Aside from the tuxedo look, I also considered these ideas:

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Vogue 9253; image is property of BMV Patterns

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“The Dress” from Atonement in all its glory! (Image not mine.)

I had fabrics suitable for both looks, but ultimately decided against them. (I was afraid the Vogue pattern would look too much like a robe or caftan in my black and ivory shibori-dyed crepe-back satin fabric, and couldn’t decide how best to approach the Atonement dress from a pattern starting point.) I had the tux fabrics as well–bought with that intention in mind–and decided I might as well make that for my party! All I had to do was decide on what I wanted it to look like and how to style it–you know, little stuff. 😉 My main inspirations were these two outfits:

That is Evan Rachel Wood in Altuzarra at the 2017 Golden Globes, and Gwyneth Paltrow in Balmain at the 2008 UK premiere of Iron Man. (Honorable mention: Octavia Spencer at the 2017 Golden Globes–her navy tux was fabulous as well!) ERW wore tons of tuxedos for events recently, and I was very inspired by just about all of them. And Gwyneth’s 2008 Iron Man premiere outfit is still one of her best-ever looks, IMO–I remember seeing coverage of that outfit at the time and haven’t forgotten it. (Or those fabulous square-toed satin McQueen pumps, because goddamn.) I made this Pinterest board so you all can see more of the looks I was inspired by while I was planning out this thing!

Lady Tux: The Big Reveal

So okay, I wanted a tux. But what would it look like? That was the hard part. In the end, I decided on slim-but-straight trousers with front slash pockets and “racing stripes,” a jacket with a peaked lapel that was single-breasted with one button and which would fall below my high hip, and a lace camisole for underneath (my nod to the Paltrow outfit, basically). I’ll have more detail on all of these things in the next posts!

I used 3 patterns for this outfit: 1 for each piece. O_o The jacket is a Burda pattern that was originally in a magazine but is now available for download: #127B 11/2012. Originally I was hoping for something less shaped and slightly more “boyfriend” in the cut, but there doesn’t appear to be a pattern in existence that fulfills my wants! 😉 This was close enough, especially since it came with jetted pockets and a peaked lapel AND was longer, which I really wanted; I was willing to endure a more feminine cut for those things. The trousers are the pants portion of V9160, aka The Jumpsuit of My Dreams That Wasn’t. Here is where I made a mistake, but more on that later. The camisole is the much-loved Ogden Cami by True Bias.

 

And as you saw in my teaser photo above, those three pieces came together to make THIS ridiculousness:

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I won’t go into construction details of each piece here–that’s what Parts 2 and 3 are for–but I’ll share my general impressions with you now.

You can see the Altuzarra inspo in the lapels, which are peaked and done in a contrasting satin-finish fabric, and in the pockets, jacket length, and single-button configuration; my trousers also have the trademark “tuxedo stripe” down the side seams. I didn’t make my trousers wide or flared though, and obviously the styling is a bit different. The Paltrow outfit inspiration is less direct than how I interpreted the tux, since it’s a dress! But I think it looks like I was inspired by that dress, even if I didn’t make the same kind of outfit.

Overall, I’m basically happy with this outfit. I wouldn’t want another sewer to look too closely at any piece of it though–it’s definitely not my best work. I do think I achieved the “look” I was going for: it’s feminine-ish, but very much has that masculine edge because it’s a tux. One of my co-workers commented thusly: “Girl, you are cold-blooded. For real!!” That made me feel like a fucking badass, you guys! (Especially since that co-worker was wearing a totally amazing sequined dress and is enviably tall and gorgeous.) I will say this: I’m not 100% happy with this outfit as a representation of my work, but it does show well. 😉

Here are some shots from the party:

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Xmas Tux!

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Date night!

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Front view, minus the jacket

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Literally the only time I took my jacket off at the event…

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Unbuttoned!

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The button had just broken before we took these. >=(

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One of us had been drinking (sadly, it wasn’t me)…

So now that you’ve seen the whole shebang here, Parts 2 and 3 will cover the “making of” details for each piece.

Thanks for reading! ❤