Mic Check

Hi! I mean, assuming anyone is still out there reading this. 😉

I started this draft back in January; in the meantime a lot has happened. The world has exploded into something out of a pandemic movie, minus zombies and widespread looting (except for corporations and the rich, that is. #zing). COVID-19 has affected everyday life for us, just like pretty much everyone else in the US. We’re both working from home (at once both relieved to have income/health insurance and bemused at the strange determination of our companies to focus on business right now) and making the best of it; frankly this isn’t hard, apart from my superhuman need for solitude and the constant occupation of our living space by both humans in this family making true solitude utterly impossible. But I can still pick up takeout, and have largely been able to get everything we’ve needed at the grocery thus far, so we’re doing quite well. *shrug* To up the shenanigans ante, in mid-March I accidentally ate cauliflower, which I am allergic to (not because I am fool enough to eat it, but because a pizza place used the wrong crust and I had no idea what I was eating until it was too late), and promptly followed that up with a kidney infection. (Spoiler alert: I am not old, young, or pregnant enough to be socially forgiven for pissing myself, so thank fuck I was already working from home when that happened.)

All of the above was surpassed–at least in terms of my own personal bubble and emotions–by the death of my dad on March 30. This was both expected (he was old and had been dealing with a health issue for a few years) and totally shocking (we didn’t know how bad his condition really was because of him refusing treatment and our parents being unreliable narrators, plus he went downhill very rapidly–over the course of one day, really). On top of all this, I couldn’t travel to Texas to be with my family: my preexisting lung condition means flying during this particular pandemic would be incredibly fucking stupid, and at any rate the hospital was not allowing any non-patients in anyway. I said goodbye to him over a telephone, held to his comatose ear by a (very kind and sympathetic) nurse, which even for a dysfunctional family like ours is hardly closure. I’m not close with my parents; I won’t go into that so much here, aside from saying that complicated relationships make for complicated grief, and while I anticipated this I could not have prepared for the reality. My own struggle is compounded by the expectation that I should help manage my remaining parent’s emotions; not to air too much dirty laundry, but knowing what I know about their toxic “relationship” (if it may be so called) and having had difficult relationships with both of them makes this expectation really, really, unpalatable. At the same time, I want to help my siblings and do what they ask because they’re important to me. Rock, meet hard place.

TL;DR version: aside from getting pizza, it’s been shit, y’all. 

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Tycho side-eyeing his vet *and* this entire year so far.

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Your palate cleanser: my dog eating an apple.

Below is the draft as it was before the Ides n’ Ends of March whooped my boney ass. I still want to put it out there (I have serious regret over not just hitting “Publish” in February!) and hopefully re-engage here more regularly soon. Thanks for reading. ❤


Maybe others are noticing this also, but blogs seem to be in decline these days. I get it: Instagram makes it easy to immediately connect and interact. Even I use IG much more regularly than I blog (albeit at what I suspect is a lower-than-average frequency) so I’m part of that trend myself. But speaking only for myself, I still love blogs! Maybe it’s a temperament thing (I like reading long-form things AND writing long-form things) but I do enjoy reading posts on blogs I follow when I have the time and energy. Perhaps I’m just in the minority there, and am a dinosaur. 🙂

Obviously my own blog has suffered from neglect in recent months. I’ve been in a dark mental space for the past couple of years and am still struggling to emerge from that; between personal things, seemingly the entire world reverting to the baser human instincts of cruelty, hatred, and selfishness in the name of perpetuating white supremacy and late-stage capitalism, and my work life taking a demoralizing turn (plus having to write the company blog), I just haven’t had the mental energy to keep this space up the way I’d like to. Even my sewing and knitting practices have suffered: I made fewer things last year than in previous years, and so many stitches felt like work rather than a hobby I engage in for fun. This year isn’t exactly off to a running start either, which is sad; on one hand, I need an outlet to help me feel better, but on the other I struggle to participate in my hobbies when I’m feeling low–it’s a lose-lose situation. I don’t really have a point here, just trying to put into words why this blog has fallen by the wayside. 😉

There’s so much I didn’t share on the blog last year that I wanted to: home remodeling projects from 2018! Shit I made for our vacation! Our vacation!! A truly hilarious FAIL of a project from Halloween! The outfit I made–for Tom–for my office holiday party! There’s more I’m forgetting.

Normally for my first post of the year, I’d be excitedly fucking around with pie charts in Excel to break down what I sewed, choosing favorites among my successes and flops alike, and thinking ahead to the next year of creating. This year I’m not doing any 2019 Top 5 posts at all. 😦 (It’s funny, but having no blog posts for a lot of the stuff I made last year makes it really fucking hard to remember and count up the stuff I made!) Not because I quit sewing or anything–no way!–but because I just can’t find the energy to do it. That doesn’t mean I’m not thinking about 2020 though!

This year, I am committed to lightweighting my stash and only sewing/knitting from what I have. People, I have so much stash–for knitting and sewing alike. It’s appalling. I am not a minimalist (if my entire wardrobe fit–by choice–on one ugly-ass, not-in-a-closet-where-it-belongs rack I would weep bitter tears) but I’ve reached a point where I am overwhelmed by what I own and am finally prepared to do something about it. I want to lessen my consumption because I believe it’s the right thing to do for myself, for my family, and for the planet. I want to look at my fabric (and yarn) and see limitless creative potential instead of a cringe-inducing hoard. To that end, I have unsubscribed from all fabric and yarn emails and have also unfollowed any shops I followed on Instagram. I have also started the tedious, shame-vomit-inducing process of going through my stash and purging things. Because the yarn world has Ravelry, I am listing yarn for destash over there. I still need to purge more yarn, but for now I’ve done the first wave and it felt awesome. As for fabric outcasts, I dropped the first wave of those off at Goodwill already, and still hope to get rid of more. (Yes, I know: Goodwill donations usually end up foisted on the developing world and/or in the trash. My mental health and the planet are at odds on this item, and if I wait for a perfect solution to come along I will still be here waiting when EarthDeath occurs; I won’t have my sanity anymore, but I’ll have tons of fabric I won’t sew. O_o A compromise must be made. Don’t @ me.) I’m hoping that removing this roadblock of STUFF will help me dream up future projects, and generally get more joy out of my hobbies.

Fingers crossed, but my 2020 is improving in terms of my hobbies. I need more socks so I plan to focus my 2020 knitting efforts on my sock drawer, but I do want to cast on another sweater very soon too. Sewing-wise I have made 4 pairs of bottoms AND 3 knit tops in 2020, plus I’m still making that ridiculous quilt every month. O_o On balance, that’s a commendable start! There’s also a pile of mending for me to do, which while not creatively fulfilling is at least helpful and counts as sewing! Tom and I are also committed to eliminating as much single-use plastic from our house as we can, so I will be making reusable produce bags and cloth napkins, plus knitting dishcloths at some point. (Let me point out that it’s not individual people but corporations and industry that are chiefly responsible for the appalling state of our planet, and that the onus is being wrongfully placed on consumers to change instead of the biggest contributors to climate destruction. However, we still want to do the best we can to limit our own household’s contribution to waste and pollution and are in a position–economically, medically, and otherwise–to take these steps. I fully appreciate that this is not the case for everyone and do not intend my personal declarations to apply universally. <3)

I did buy yarn earlier this year because mohair is having A Moment and I didn’t have any for the 2 patterns I wanted to make (because who stashes a random sweater quantity of mohair, anyway?!?), and of course it turns out I AM ALLERGIC TO MOHAIR. :’-( WHYYYYYY?!? So all the mohair I bought was gifted to a friend–I hope she can see past my appalling taste in colors! In my mourning period I bought 4 skeins of sock yarn but now I swear I’m done! I did buy some fabric also, but a very kind friend gave me a gift card to a fabric store local to them and that was my motivation. I only got 2 fabrics, so it was a very modest haul.


In closing, I hope anyone still reading this is safe and able to find ways to care for themselves mentally and physically during this completely surreal time.

Speaking of surreal, here’s a .gif from a music video my band made several years ago; maybe it will cheer someone out there up. 😀 (And yes, the song is about Easter Peeps.)

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Easter Peeps

A Triumphant(ish) Return!

Hellooooooooooo! Is anyone still out there? 🙂

After a serious lack of sewing mojo (and opportunity), I finally started sewing for Fall/Winter in November. O_o I also managed to sneak in a very minor costume project back in October, which I will also show you today.

I have missed blogging so much! (And sewing, for that matter.) This was a weird year: in February we found out that Tom would be without a job come November, which was highly stressful to say the least. (This was not helped by the extra-long timeline and a severance worth waiting for at the end of it.) Seriously folks, my hair started thinning and graying during that time because of how stressed out I was about it. I didn’t mention it here because I had no way of knowing how it would work out, and it didn’t seem appropriate to air it and have it hanging over not just my IRL life, but my blog and sewing life as well.

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Bonus cat-in-an-inappropriate-place photo

Happily, I can report that Tom not only found a better job before his end date, but that he still managed to get his severance out of the old place. Yay!!!! But between that whole thing and undertaking several remodeling projects in the Fall–smoke ’em if you got ’em, amirite?–I spent most of the year stressed out, fluttering between self-distracting productivity and creative paralysis (the kind with TONS of ideas but not the will to execute them). 😦 The real death blow for my sewing came in July/August when we had an appraisal done on the house and I had to tear down my sewing space. This was immediately followed by having our upstairs floors refinished, so all my sewing stuff in the attic got buried by a floor’s worth of furniture and clutter that we still haven’t fully put back to rights. And at that point, Tom did not have the new job lined up yet. Say it with me: UGHHHHHH. (Double UGHHHHHH for clinical depression and anxiety on top of all of this, which made everything that much worse.) I still haven’t got my supplies sorted out, but I’ve been able to sew a few things and am slowly relaxing and getting inspired again after being totally wound up for months on end.

So that’s been my last few months. But now we can get back to THE SEWING!!!

First up: a Talvikki sweater!

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Oof, that face! O_o

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The important view of this pattern

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Artsy photo

This was a much-needed “win” project after months of limited sewing time and scarce inspiration. I love the fabric/pattern combo, and think it will be great dressed up or down through Winter!

The fabric is a scuba from Marcy Tilton, and I love it. I hardly ever shop there (it’s an issue of the selection not being totally up my alley and the prices, both for fabric AND shipping) but I’m glad I treated myself to this piece. Initially I thought I’d make a skirt but I have to acknowledge that knit skirts just aren’t my jam. I had *just* enough yardage to get this top cut out–and I mean just. It was worth the tetris.

And now for something unlike anything I usually trouble you with around here: a costume piece!

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Yes, I took outdoor photos of this thing *in December* for you all. You’re welcome.

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The back is the best bit, of course.

This is underwear. 1920s-30s underwear, to be exact. (And yes, those are vintage shoes ca. 1930s also–I love them.) The pattern is Depew Patterns #2029 and I very highly recommend it. I didn’t really follow the directions for sewing it but everything went together beautifully. Really, it’s a relatively easy project if you fancy some old-fashioned (and complicated-in-the-bathroom, since it doesn’t have a snap crotch) undergarments!

You might be wondering why I’d go to the trouble of making costume underwear, especially since I own extant undergarments from this exact time period (that DO have snap crotches). Well…I had an event!

I mentioned it in my Top 5 post for last year, but this event is called “Tales from the Crypt.” It’s held at Green Lawn Abbey and this year, I was honored to be asked to help with the event as an actor once again. (And not as an understudy, yay!) Since the researcher who did most of the work on my “character” and I had more time to talk about a staging setup, we had quite a developed idea going into the event. (Which was definitely mostly his idea!) He was going for a boudoir-like setting: a vanity table, mirror and brush set, and me in a dressing gown surrounded by playbills. (My “character” was a Ziegfeld Follies girl!) I was game, but didn’t want to wear my extant undergarments because they’re ivory and slightly sheer. My skin is also ivory and slightly sheer–not a good mix. 😉 And while awe-inspiring, the setting–a mausoleum ca. 1927 whose interior is white marble, at night, lit mainly by candlelight and gas lamps–didn’t really lend itself to my pasty skin in pasty lingerie standing out against the white background. So I decided to make something!

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Green Lawn Abbey; photo is property of Green Lawn Abbey Preservation Association

The teddy fabric is polyester charmeuse but the color is good for the era, and making it myself allowed me to line the entire bodice for added opacity. (No bra was going to work with that back!) I was also planning to make a kimono-inspired robe from Depew Patterns #3039 (also from 1927–how freaky is that?!?) but I picked a brocade that ended up being way too heavy for the shape of the design. I got it most of the way made and tried it on, and thought it looked like an appropriative wizard’s robe. (The fabric had a general Asian motif, since that was very popular in the 1910s and 1920s.) O_o So I scrapped that and decided I would wear my own extant vintage robe, which is a striking lapis blue color dating to the 1940s. The style is very much kimono-inspired, and could pass for something earlier.

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As close the The Charleston as I’m going to get…

And then on the day, the weather was COLD. Like, mid-40s and raining. And this building isn’t heated. The event lasts for multiple hours, and consists of 4 separate monologues for each actor on opening night. So in an effort to protect my health* I opted for a true vintage dress in the end. But I did wear my teddy underneath it! I was very nervous, and wearing something I made always makes me feel more confident in any situation. 😀

*Yeah yeah, I know that the temperature doesn’t make people sick. However, exposure can lower your body’s ability to fend off invading pathogens; since my lungs are vulnerable to infections already, this was not a risk I was willing to take.

Here are some photos from the event, courtesy of my resident paparazzi husband Tom, who was “voluntold” to take photos of the 2nd show that weekend. 😉

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Fancy lady

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You can see Sylvia, my “character,” in the background photo

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Artful makeup application

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Playbills for actual productions Sylvia was in!

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Our intrepid cast this year!

So that’s a lot of words about non-sewing stuff, far fewer about a cool sweater, and probably too many about a silly costume piece made out of polyester. 😉 I’m looking forward to sharing my (likely) final project for 2018 shortly, as well as doing my Top 5 posts for this year. I’ve been pretty absent from this blog lately, and I’ve had a hard time keeping up with my friends, both in real-life and online. Here’s hoping 2019 is a more active year in all those respects!

Thanks for reading, and I’ll see you again soon!

 

Remodeling “Mads”ness – Our Bathroom Remodel!

Can you say, “MAKEOVERRRRR“?!?

I know I said I’d share fabric organization stuff next, but I haven’t gotten photos of that yet. (Mostly because my yarn still needs to be organized and put away…shhh!) So how about a detour to our new bathroom instead? It’s only one door down the hallway from the sewing stash! 😉 This post is definitely not sewing-related AND it’s really long, so if sewing is all you’re here for it’s totally cool if you close this tab and move along. No hard feelings!

A year ago, we decided to seriously explore having at least one of the 2 bathrooms in our house remodeled. This project was without a doubt the biggest undertaking we’ve ever had as homeowners, and definitely took a lot of time and energy. (And also $$ but that’s because we hired a professional.) Now that it is finally finished (our designer came to take final photos earlier this week), I thought it would be fun to share the project with you guys from the beginning.

Background

Originally, we had planned to try doing both bathrooms–they both needed some major TLC, but for different reasons. One was just old and outdated in its fittings (or so we thought), while the other was new but definitely not done properly. We knew we wanted to hire this out: we’re somewhat ambitious DIYers, but this seemed like something better left to a professional.

After getting a quote for both bathrooms, we discussed it and decided that, while it would be awesome to have them both redone, we would be better served using the money for the second, newer bathroom on a mini-split system for the attic and a new water heater (ours was 20 years old). We have exactly ZERO regrets about that choice, for the record. 🙂 Having made that choice, we moved forward with our plans for the upstairs bathroom!

Here is what that room looked like when we bought the house (and until we remodeled it):

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The back corner of the room; note the original baseboards!

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Old vanity, medicine cabinet/mirror, and sconces, plus the linen closet! Also note the outlet–it will move and look nicer later!

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Original claw foot tub, rigged to function as a shower. That cupboard thing is hiding the water lines. Classy, no?

While our contractor employs designers, we had a definite idea of what we wanted: a walk-in shower with tiled walls and a frameless glass door, a floating vanity, and vinyl plank flooring. We also picked our own color scheme very early in the “nebulous will-we-or-won’t-we discussion” phase. Believe it or not, Tom is the one who picked out the final paint color at first! The only disagreement we ever had–and which was more of a running joke than an actual disagreement–was about the purple accent tile he wanted but that I vetoed as hard as I have ever slapped down a design suggestion in my life. It was awful. 😉 (Imagine “Cotton Candy Purple” glass tiles, in round bubble shapes of varying sizes. Just…no.) ANYWAY. We had ideas. The final result is very true to what we wanted, which makes it that much more exciting!

It Begins

We had decided to do the demo work ourselves to save money ($1,000), and also to save that magnificent bitch of a bathtub you see in the photo above. See, our contractors are good people, but they’re not historic salvagers. They were going to smash that tub into bits to get it out of our house, folks. I couldn’t allow it. It hurt me to think of that tub–an original piece of our home’s history–being destroyed and sent to a landfill when it could still be of use to someone. And at least in our part of the world, people WANT these antique tubs! I don’t get it myself–I haven’t taken baths since I was a little kid–but I will happily contribute to the supply. I called our local architectural salvage (yep, that’s a thing we have in Columbus!) and they not only came and hauled the tub away with nary a scratch put on it OR my house, they paid me for that. In cash. I know, right?!? So I did a good deed AND got $50 for it. Unfortunately, that was where the good aspects of doing the demolition ourselves ended.

First, we had to cut the water and drain lines to that tub before they would come and get it. (Fair enough, right?) This required turning off the water to the entire house because there were no shut-offs for these pipes. Oh, and we also needed a saw and caps. And one water line was bigger than the other, so an emergency trip back to the hardware store for a different size cap was required at like, 7PM. Yay. We had no trouble removing the old sconces, medicine cabinet, or vanity. Well, I say “we,” but mostly I mean Tom. 😀 Tom also replaced the old outlet with a new GFCI outlet and relocated it; we also installed a new vent fan/light combo mostly ourselves, but with an assist from our roofer with the outdoors parts.

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Much better than the can light that preceded it.

I will note that we would have LOVED to redo the ceiling in this room, but it would have been a big expense. We have no idea what state the original plaster is in under that ugly-ass paneling, and that wasn’t a can of worms we were interested in opening and paying for since the paneling isn’t in disrepair. 😦

I took the lead on removing about 90 years worth of poorly-applied paint from the baseboards, since we were going to repaint them and wanted our fresh semi-gloss paint to look nice. This project took me weeks, and actually resulted in nerve damage to my right ulnar nerve; I still lose feeling in my right hand on occasion, even 4-5 months after finishing that work. As such, I am definitely counting the paint removal as demolition! 😀

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That grain hadn’t seen the light of day in close to 100 years…

We had to resort to some heavy artillery to get the paint off (Peel-Away 1, if you find yourself in a similar situation–IT IS AMAZING but also very involved), but I’m so glad we put the time and money (and bodily injury) into that project because there were SO MANY LAYERS and most were so badly applied! And since the base layers were old lacquer paint applied over the original stain, they didn’t respond to anything less intense than this product.

That’s not to say things went totally according to plan; one huge issue was revealed when the vanity was finally out of the room:

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Yep, that’s a hole in the floor and allll the vanity pipes come out of it. (But do you see my nice new outlet?!?)

That little gem is definitely NOT up to building codes. And my designer, upon seeing a photo of it, said she had “never seen anything like that–ever.” Hooray. That metal button on the wall is an old vent pipe for a sink that has long since been removed; that pipe is still in the wall, BTW. It is also lead, as were all the original pipes in this house before they were eventually converted to modern PVC. Our theory, which is probably close to the truth, is that the lead pipes to this bathroom had frozen and leaked, and this was someone’s quick and cost-effective workaround. When we bought the house, there were still lead drain pipes in use in this bathroom (which we replaced during the Polar Vortex of 2014 when they, surprise, froze and leaked) so that just makes the most sense!

You are probably wondering WTF that gray shit is all over the floor, right? Yeah, that was what was still stuck to the subfloor after we removed the roll-on vinyl floor (as seen in the “Before” photos further up the post). Tom had to remove that, too; it was a difficult job and he’s my hero for doing it by himself. And then the floors looked like this:

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What The Actual Fuck?!?!?

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Seriously, can we put the fuzzy gray stuff back on?

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But WHYYYYYYYYYY????

Clearly, the original floors in this room had been hard done by, as evidenced by their almost total replacement with a patchwork of mostly-plywood subfloor. The original floorboards are the narrower slats you see in the last pic, up against the wall. For the uninitiated among you, the number of joints in the subfloor in these photos is BAD. More joints = less structurally sound. This floor and those pipes for the vanity were a hard lesson for us in remodeling an old house: once you start a project, there’s no turning back, no matter what sort of fuckery you encounter. And fuckery was present in abundance: some asshole used PEGBOARD to support the rotten floor under the toilet and water lines for the tub. Pegboard. Which comes with holes already in it and is basically made of compressed glue and sawdust. >=[ If there is a heaven, the people who ruined this bathroom did not go there.

To make matters worse, because of repeated leaking and nobody ever moving that original cast-iron tub (EVER–they even cut holes and slits in the old vinyl floor to go around the feet), the floor had a definite dip where the tub used to be. The floors in the entire room also slant slightly toward the vanity wall, but this didn’t worry us–or our carpenter–much. (All the floors in our house do this–it’s 106 years old, and that chimney is so heavy that it has created a vortex of suck over time. Not ideal, but not a scary “The House Is Going To Fall Down!!!!!!!!” kind of thing.)

Bringing In The Pros

Finally, we had the demo finished. Unfortunately, our carpenter was still stuck on a previous job due to a last-minute catastrophe. As a result, our start date got pushed back to October; not a big deal, but we had done the demo at the end of August/beginning of September because we expected a September start date. So we essentially ended up with an unnecessary extra month of living with only 1 bathroom. (I know that’s a total First World Whine, but you’d be amazed at how fast you can become accustomed to having 2 toilets for 2 people…) But in October, the pros arrived and the rebuilding began!

Phase 1 for poor Doug the Carpenter was plumbing. It was at this juncture that we all found out–because learning is FUN!–that some asshole (who, again, is not in heaven) had cut off all the vent pipes for this bathroom long ago. If you didn’t know, bathroom plumbing requires venting for sewer gas in order to work properly and meet modern building codes (at least in the US); our vents had been cut and capped for reasons that still elude us. It took Doug a couple of weeks to have the plumbing done properly, but he did it!

And because of the awful nature of the subfloor already, Doug decided to do the plumbing work from below–our kitchen has a drop ceiling, so access was very easy to obtain and didn’t damage our ceiling in any way. Unfortunately, making room for Doug to work from there meant that our kitchen got torn apart and rearranged for the duration of the remodel. But what can you do, right? We just went to the basement if we needed to use the microwave and made it work. 😀

Here are some fun photos of the preparation phase of the plumbing work:

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This is the spot where we found pegboard used to support the sad floor. O_o

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That’s Tom, in our kitchen…downstairs. Thank goodness for drop ceilings! (PS: See the pegboard in the upper right corner???)

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Ever wondered what the top of my oven and vent hood look like from the next floor? Here you go. I made cookies the day before!

And here are photos of Doug’s work, done properly (at last):

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Future shower head/faucet! (Those paints in the frame are NOT the ones we used–we did a slightly darker variation of each.)

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What a plaster and lathe wall looks like on the *inside*…pretty cool, right?

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New vanity plumbing, NOT coming through the floor underneath.

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New toilet plumbing and drain stack

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Shower drain and rough-in for the pan; those dark areas of wall are where baseboards used to be.

And because Doug is a goddamn hero (and a professional), he laid new subfloor over top of the shit-show that was already there:

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LOOK AT THE DIFFERENCE THO.

Now we were getting somewhere! Next is the really fun stuff: the shower being built! But before that could happen, Doug needed his supplies. Unfortunately, between us having to take the doors off the room AND the closet and all Doug’s supplies, this meant a few weeks of living in the middle of an obstacle course:

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Ummm…did I accidentally wander onto the set of Nickelodeon’s GUTS?

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Somehow, this shower pan was going to fit in my bathroom.

I can’t tell you how many bruises I had on my upper thighs from cracking into the vanity there in the foreground of the first photo! But we did get used to it, oddly enough; like the kitchen, it was just something we had to live with if we wanted the bathroom done.

The shower really began to take shape once the pan was installed, though:

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First phase: cement board!

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Next, a rubberized waterproof coating; it goes on pink and dries red!

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Holy shit, it’s our tile!!

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Even without the grout applied, it looked amazing.

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You can *just* see the Schluter metal piece on the outside of the tile here–we did that instead of a bullnose tile.

From here, Doug did the grout to finish off all the tile. (We went with a light silvery gray to match.) Once he had this done, he turned his attention to the flooring and installing the vanity. At this point, I was told it was okay to start painting the trim and walls. The toilet needed to be installed as well, so I started in that corner. I had already primed all the baseboards–never skip that step! 🙂

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OMG THE FLOOR!!!

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Even 1/3 done, it looked awesome.

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Making its way toward the closet…

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Magical Levitating Vanity, plus paint!

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Coming together!

From there, things moved fast: Doug installed the toilet, did me a solid by painting the woodwork and wall under the vanity, and installed the shower fixtures and shelves and the quarter-round along the baseboards and pan. After that, your intrepid blogger finished painting the rest of the room and the doors. About a week later, the shower door arrived and was installed. Considering how long the first parts took, this all felt like it flew by!

All that remained was for us to install the wall cabinets, mirror, and fixtures we’d bought at IKEA, put the re-painted doors back on, and have the final inspection and pass it (which we did). And then, in December, IT WAS FINISHED:

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!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Even the toilet is pretty!

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Seriously, it is a different room now!

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Close-up of the AMAZING shower tile and shelves. The glass tile is a beautiful iridescent purple but it’s hard to photograph…

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‘Sup.

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So beautiful!

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Automatic nightlight action

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How I felt when it was all done

So, that was our big remodel adventure of 2016! It took months, and at times felt like it would never be finished, but we are really glad we did it. We’ve added a few things since I took these last photos: there’s a towel bar on the back wall (with the window) now, a hand towel bar under the cabinet next to the vanity, and some hanging hooks on each door. We also got new bathmats and towels thanks to my in-laws, who gave us a Kohl’s gift card for Xmas. I hope you guys enjoyed the transformation; it’s still hard to believe that this bathroom is part of my house–especially after seeing it during that demolition phase, LOL!

Hopefully I’ll see you guys back here soon with fabric organization and possibly even some SEWING! Thanks for sticking with me! ❤

*I should note that we bought the IKEA stuff (mirror, cabinets, bathroom hardware, and vanity), along with the shelves for the shower and the flooring and underlayment ourselves, with our contractor’s encouragement. Our designer was wonderful at helping us determine what things would be cheaper to source ourselves.*

Have you undertaken a big remodeling project before? Tell me about it!